Long-term consequences

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Persistent symptoms

Many concussions resolve over the course of a few days or weeks. However, for some people symptoms can persist for many weeks, months, and even years.

Where symptoms last longer than four weeks (or 28 days) it is called persistent post-concussion symptoms. In the case of persistent symptoms specific advice and treatment should be sought from a healthcare professional.

Rehabilitation and advice from health professionals with expertise in concussion can help recovery and to return to sport.

Second impact syndrome

Acute cerebral edema is a very rare complication of any head injury and is most often recorded in teenage males. This is normally fatal and can occur after a single impact. In previous reviews of concussion, this serious outcome has been associated with two concussions occurring in a short time frame (2nd Impact Syndrome). The fact that a single impact may cause cerebral edema reinforces the need to remove any player from sport as soon as a concussion is suspected. If in doubt sit it out.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive head impacts. CTE is a relatively ‘rediscovered’ disease that requires further research.

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Try This: Second Impact Syndrome

Peter Robinson is Ben Robinson’s father. Ben was a young vibrant teenager who sadly passed away as a result of a brain injury caused by the repeated blows to the head he suffered during a school rugby match.

Since then, Peter has been raising awareness about brain injuries, and he wants young sportspeople to be better protected. Culture is the glue that holds our sportspeople together, a concussion may seem like a “wee knock”, but that knock can change a life forever.

Please Note: This podcast contains sensitive content as Peter speaks about his son’s death.

Actions need to change - if in doubt, sit them out.