Module Menu

My role as a Team Mate

Teammates influence each other. The way you talk about and react to concussion will influence how others react.

Athletes report these reasons for not reporting concussion:

  • I thought my teammates would think I am weak
  • I did not want to let my team down
  • I did not want to lose playing time
  • I thought my coach would get mad

When someone has a concussion, it can be very difficult to sit outside the team, and not be able or allowed to play – not being part of the team can be lonely.

Sometimes peers do not understand what you are going through and it is difficult to explain how it feels when you have a concussion.

As a teammate you can SPEAK UP, BE A GOOD FRIEND, PROVIDE HELP and EDUCATE OTHERS

How is it in your team?

Take a minute to think about the questions and discuss with your teammates, your parents or coach:

  • Is it OK to report an injury or concussion?
  • What do your teammates think about reporting concussion?
  • Do you hide symptoms to be able to play?
  • How do you, your teammates & coach react when someone gets injured?

Did You Know?

Did you know that when returning to sport you have to follow a stepwise approach and that most athletes take 2-4 weeks to return to sport after concussion?

This embedded video comes from YouTube and won't load without cookies.
Please accept marketing cookies to watch our videos.
My Role as a Teammate Infographic
Click the image above to view full size

My Role as a Teammate

Speak Up

Encourage your teammate to tell their coach, peer or parent if they have or think they have a concussion

Be a Good Friend

Having a concussion can be difficult and challenging – your friend may feel isolated, nervous or scared

Provide Help

School and social activities can be difficult – ask your friend how you can help them

Educate Peers

Sometimes bullying can happen, especially when other peers don’t understand what a concussion is and the recovery process that comes with it